Category Archives: News

DEADLINE IS TODAY TO REGISTER!

Today is the deadline to register to vote in the Na’i Aupuni ‘Aha Candidate Elections.
Here’s the certified list so you can find out if you’re registered to vote:
If you’re not already registered, this is the link to register online:
Deadline to register is today. Voting starts November 1.

Na‘i Aupuni Candidates, Electorate Encouraged to Vote Informed!

KALIHI PALAMA HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB INVITES
Na‘i Aupuni Candidates and Electorate
TO LEARN ABOUT THE CANDIDATES!
VOTE INFORMED!

In November 2015, Native Hawaiians registered on the Native Hawaiian Roll (aka Kana‘iolowalu), will vote for delegates to an ‘aha. The purpose of the ‘aha is to decide whether or not to create a document or constitution for a nation (aka self-governing entity) and its governance. Any document, constitution or structure developed at the ‘Aha may be voted upon in a referendum by Native Hawaiians registered on the Native Hawaiian Roll (aka Kana‘iolowalu).

Information about delegate candidates can be found at: www.naiaupuni.org or at
vote.election-america.com/naiaupuni/bios.htm. You can still register to vote by October 15, 2015 at  www.kanaiolowalu.org/registernow

Additionally, the Kalihi Palama Hawaiian Civic Club has created a website for the purpose of providing a venue for delegate candidates to make known their candidacy and position on certain issues; and to inform the electorate on delegate candidates. The service is free.

www.NativeHawaiian.org

Delegate candidates are invited to apply to be on the NativeHawaiian.org website and persons registered to vote in the election of delegates are invited to the website to learn about the candidates.

Check out the NativeHawaiian.org website to learn of delegate candidate positions on the following questions:

  1. What are your qualifications to be a delegate to the ‘aha?
  2. How would you characterize the values of your campaign to be elected as a delegate to the ‘aha, for example, with aloha, lokahi, kūpono, etc.?
  3. What three components of the constitution are you particularly interested in advocating and why?
  4. What governance model will you advocate for?
  5. Are you willing to discuss other governance models?.
  6. How would the governance model that you choose impact the ali‘i trusts, the Hawaiian Homestead Act, federal contracts made with Native Hawaiian businesses; grants provided by the United States for programs and services to the Native Hawaiian people?
  7. In your governance model, would you be inclusive of people other than Native Hawaiians as citizens?
  8. How do you see participation by others in helping the ‘aha on the various aspects of the draft constitution?
  9. Looking ahead, as a delegate to the ‘aha, how would you assure that the governance model ratified by the Native Hawaiian people is implemented and recognized at the state, federal, or international level, as appropriate.
  10. Why should Native Hawaiians vote for you?

For further information, contact webmaster, Blaine Fergerstrom at zztype@gmail.com, or club president Leimomi Khan at leimomi.khan@gmail.com.

List of Na’i Aupuni Candidates Released

Some 209 candidates will vie for 40 delegate positions across the islands for the Native Hawaiian ‘aha constitutional convention.

Kuhio Asam, president of Na’i Aupuni, which is in charge of running the November election and subsequent Native Hawaiian convention and ratification process, said the candidates are “diverse in their age, backgrounds and purpose. They are representative of a good cross-section of the Native Hawaiian community.”

The list of candidates was released today by Election-America, a private national company hired by the independent group Na’i Aupuni to conduct the election.

The delegates will be elected to represent Native Hawaiians who live in and out of Hawaii. They will meet next year at a constitutional convention to work on forming a Native Hawaiian government.

The election breakdown by area is: On Oahu, 110 candidates will vie for 20 delegate positions; Hawaii island, 32 candidates for 7 slots; Maui, 15 contenders for 3 positions; Kauai and Niihau, five hopefuls for two spots; Molokai and Lanai, four candidates for one position; and out of state, 43 contenders for seven slots.

Information on each candidate can be found at www.naiaupuni.org or at https://vote.election-america.com/naiaupuni/bios.htm.

Ballots to elect the delegates will be sent to certified voters on Nov.1, Election-America officials said. Votes can be cast by mail or electronically but must be received by Nov. 30.

Native Hawaiians who have not been certified can still apply with the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission (www.kanaiolowalu.org) or at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (www.oha.org/registry).

Information about the election process can be found at www.naiaupuni.org or by emailing naiaupuni@election-america.com. The deadline to be certified is Oct. 15.

Interior Proposes Path for Re-Establishing Government-to-Government Relationship with Native Hawaiian Community

Date: September 29, 2015
Contact: Jessica Kershaw, Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of the Interior announced today a proposal to create an administrative procedure and criteria that the Secretary of the Interior would apply if the Native Hawaiian community forms a unified government that then seeks a formal government-to-government relationship with the United States. Under the new proposal, the Native Hawaiian community — not the Federal government — would decide whether to reorganize a Native Hawaiian government, what form that government would take, and whether it would seek a government-to-government relationship with the United States.

“The United States has a long-standing policy of supporting self-governance for Native peoples, yet the benefits of the government-to-government relationship have long been denied to Native Hawaiians, one of our nation’s largest indigenous communities,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Today’s proposal is testament to the Obama Administration’s strong support for our nation’s Native peoples’ right to self-determination.”

The proposal, which takes the form of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), builds on more than 150 Federal statutes that Congress has enacted over the last century to recognize and implement the special political and trust relationship between the United States and the Native Hawaiian community. The NPRM comes on the heels of a robust and transparent public comment period as part of an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) process that began last year and included public meetings. More than 5,000 members of the public submitted written responses to the ANPRM, and they overwhelmingly favored creating a pathway for re-establishing a formal government-to-government relationship.

“We’ve listened to the feedback we received during the public meetings and in writing and worked to improve the proposal to reflect those comments,” added Jewell. “We appreciate the many voices on this topic and look forward to hearing from the public on this proposal.”

If a government-to-government relationship is reestablished, it can provide the community with greater flexibility to preserve its distinct culture and traditions and special status under Federal law that enables the community to exercise powers of self-government over many issues directly impacting community members.

The Native Hawaiian community has not had a formal government since the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1893. In 1993, Congress enacted the Apology Resolution, which offered an apology to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the United States for its role in the overthrow and committed the Federal government to a process of reconciliation. As part of that reconciliation process, in 2000 the Department of the Interior and the Department of Justice jointly issued a report identifying as its lead recommendation the need to foster self-determination for Native Hawaiians under Federal law.

Today’s proposal is available for review at www.doi.gov/ohr, and public comments on it will be accepted for the next 90 days. Members of the public are encouraged to read the proposal and provide comments in writing by email to part50@doi.gov, on www.regulations.gov (docket no. DOI-2015-0005), or by U.S. mail/hand delivery to the Office of the Secretary, Department of the Interior, Room 7228, 1849 C St. NW, Washington, DC 20240. The public is also encouraged to participate in teleconferences on the proposed rule, a schedule of which is available here.

https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/interior-department-proposes-pathway-re-establishing-government-government

 

Federal government proposes new path to sovereignty

Posted: Sep 29, 2015 9:34 AM HST Updated: Sep 29, 2015 9:44 AM HST

The U.S. Department of the Interior on Tuesday announced a proposal to create an administrative procedure that would apply if the Native Hawaiian community forms a unified government that then seeks a formal government-to-government relationship with the United States.

Under the new proposal, the Native Hawaiian community – not the Federal government – would decide whether to reorganize a Native Hawaiian government, what form that government would take, and whether it would seek a government-to-government relationship with the United States.

“The United States has a long-standing policy of supporting self-governance for Native peoples, yet the benefits of the government-to-government relationship have long been denied to Native Hawaiians, one of our nation’s largest indigenous communities,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Today’s proposal is a testament to the Obama Administration’s strong support for our nation’s Native peoples’ right to self-determination.”

After the announcement, the following statements were released by Hawaii’s congressional delegation:

“The Native Hawaiian community’s ongoing work toward self-determination takes a significant step forward today, and I applaud the Obama administration for its commitment to this effort,” said Senator Mazie K. Hirono. “Many in Hawaii have persevered for decades to reach this point. I think of those with whom I’ve worked tirelessly, both as Hawaii’s lieutenant governor and during my time in Congress, to achieve recognition for Native Hawaiians that is on par with the relationships the Federal government has established with Alaska Natives and Native Americans. I will continue to call for forward momentum on this issue until that final step is achieved.”

“Native Hawaiians have the right to reorganize a government that they determine is best for them,” said Senator Brian Schatz. “With today’s publication of proposed rules from the Department of the Interior, I urge Native Hawaiians and other interested individuals to stay engaged and to contribute their comments and concerns as the process moves forward.  I will continue working with the Department of the Interior, my colleagues in the Hawaii congressional delegation, and the Native Hawaiian community to review the draft rules.”

“Many indigenous groups in the U.S. have the right of self-determination, and today’s announcement acknowledges that that right also belongs to the Native Hawaiian people, one of the largest native communities in the country,” said Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02). “These rules incorporate over 5,000 public comments submitted to the Department of Interior (DOI), and should they be adopted, the Native Hawaiian community will have the option to re-establish a unified government and self-determine their future relationship with the federal government. I encourage all interested parties to submit their comments to DOI during the 90-day public review period to ensure a collaborative final ruling.”

“I would like to thank the Obama Administration and the Department of the Interior for strengthening the U.S. government’s relationship with the Native Hawaiian people,” said Congressman Mark Takai (HI-01). “I have always supported Native Hawaiians and will continue to make sure the community’s consensus is implemented in Washington at the federal level so that they may have more ownership of their own destiny at home.”

The Native Hawaiian community has not had a formal government since the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1893.

The Department of Interior rulemaking process began in July 2014 when the Department of the Interior announced an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, followed by 25 public meetings. After taking into consideration feedback from thousands of interested parties, the Department of the Interior published Tuesday’s Proposed Rule. This marks the beginning of a 90-day open comment period.

The proposal is available for review at http://www.doi.gov/ohr.

Copyright 2015 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

Na‘i Aupuni Confirmed Candidate Survey

APPLICATION TO POST CANDIDATE INFORMATION
ON THE KALIHI PALAMA HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB SPONSORED
NATIVEHAWAIIAN.ORG CANDIDATE INFORMATION WEBSITE

  1. INVITATION:
    1. The Kalihi Palama Hawaiian Civic Club invites you to participate on its specially created website to bring information to the electorate on candidates running to be a delegate to an ‘aha. The purpose of the ‘aha is to decide whether or not to create a document or constitution for a nation (aka self-governing entity) and its governance. Any document, constitution or structure developed at the ‘Aha may be voted upon in a referendum by Native Hawaiians registered on the Native Hawaiian Roll (aka Kana‘iolowalu).
Example page

Example candidate page.

  1. CONDITIONS FOR PARTICIPATION:
    1. You agree that the Kalihi Palama Hawaiian Civic Club reserves the right to edit responses to the questions listed below for all candidates if responses use foul language or contains derogatory remarks about any individual or organization. It also reserves the right to post and to periodically move postings from place to place on the website.
    2. You agree to submit a digital head shot photo and “cover photo,” and the application questionnaire below in to Blaine Fergerstrom, Kalihi Palama webmaster, at zztype@gmail.com. You must have permission from the copyright holder (preferably in writing) to use any photo in this presentation. Only submit photos you have explicit permission to use.
      1. Please see the Example Candidate page for a preview of what we will do with your information
    3. INDEMNIFY: You agree to indemnify, save and hold harmless the Kalihi Palama Hawaiian Civic Club, their officers and volunteers from any and all liabilities that may arise as a result of your participation on this website.
    4. REVOCATION: The Kalihi Palama Hawaiian Civic Club reserves the right to deny space, or to revoke this agreement if you fail to comply with the conditions for participation that appear elsewhere on this document.
    5. ACCEPTANCE: By submitting this application, you confirm that you have read and understand the conditions of participation as articulated herein and agree to adhere to them.

Candidate Name:
‘Aha District:
Mailing Address:
E-mail Address:
Phone number:
Website Address:
Facebook Address:
Twitter Account:
LinkedIn Profile:

We invite you to answer any or all of the below. Please respond immediately after each question.

  1. What are your qualifications to be a delegate to the ‘aha?

Your answer goes here.

  1. How would you characterize the values of your campaign to be elected as a delegate to the ‘aha for example, with aloha, lokahi, kūpono, etc.?

Your answer goes here.

  1. What three components of the constitution are you particularly interested in advocating and why?

Your answer goes here.

  1. What governance model will you advocate for?

Your answer goes here.

  1. Are you willing to discuss other governance models?

Your answer goes here.

  1. How would the governance model that you choose impact the ali‘i trusts, the Hawaiian Homestead Act, federal contracts made with Native Hawaiian businesses; grants provided by the United States for programs and services to the Native Hawaiian people?

Your answer goes here.

  1. In your governance model, would you be inclusive of people other than Native Hawaiians as citizens?

Your answer goes here.

  1. How do you see participation by others in helping the ‘aha on the various aspects of the draft constitution?

Your answer goes here.

  1. Looking ahead, as a delegate to the ‘aha, how would you assure that the governance model ratified by the Native Hawaiian people is implemented and recognized at the state, federal, or international level, as appropriate.

Your answer goes here.

  1. Why should Native Hawaiians vote for you?

Your answer goes here.