Randy Rivera

Randy Rivera

Randy Rivera

Candidate:  Randy Rivera
‘Aha District:  O‘ahu
Address: P.O. Box 700493 Kapolei, Hawaii 96709
Phone: (808) 221-1287
E-mail: randy.r808@outlook.com


  1. What are your qualifications to be a delegate to the ‘aha?

As an alumnus of Kamehameha Schools, my studies have been deeply rooted in the history, experience and countenance of the Hawaiian People.

These experiences propelled me into further study of our people and culture during my pursuit of higher education. Amongst my cultural interests during college, I enjoyed various focuses, such as political science, law, finances, debate, speech and mediation. Which I believe I can bring to the table to be an effective and positive envoy to the ’aha.

I have used this knowledge and education to serve on different committees and boards, and at present I sit as a committee chair in one capacity and a fiduciary officer in another. As a student of life, I have spent much of my time learning, educating and observing always.

  1. How would you characterize the values of your campaign to be elected as a delegate to the ‘aha for example, with aloha, lōkahi, kūpono, etc.?

There are so many Hawaiian values I cherish and believe would capture the position of my campaign.  But looking forward toward the ’aha, and the good we could do for the peoples of Hawaii. I feel the following values best characterize my campaign.

Pono – Proper, correct.
Ho’omalu – Protect.
Mālama – Care for.

This ’aha will give us the opportunity to correct or make proper the concerns of our Hawaiian people, and in doing so care for and protect our people going forward.

  1. What three components of the constitution are you particularly interested in advocating and why?

The three sections of the constitution consist of: The Preamble, The Articles (VII) and The Bill of Rights (X). All three of these sections are necessary and carry their own weight.

The Preamble focuses on establishing justice, promoting “Domestic Tranquility” and defines the powers of the government as “originating from the people.”

The Articles establishes the 3 branches of government (Legislative, Executive and Judicial), as well as defines the States, the Amendments and Ratification.

The Bill of Rights were created from the first 10 amendments to the constitution. These amendments included certain basic rights such as: freedom of speech, right to bear arms, trial by jury and freedom from cruel punishment.

Of the 3 sections of the constitution, the three components I would chose to advocate for are best realized in the lines of the Preamble.

Justice, domestic tranquility and the powers of the government “originating from the people” are the concepts which fall into alignment with my campaign position of Pono, Ho’omalu and Mālama.

  1. What governance model will you advocate for?

Of the different governance models, I am equally interested in the Traditional governance model, as well as the Constituent Representational governance models.

The Traditional model focuses on governance, where the board/delegates govern and oversees management functions.

The Constituent Representational model focuses on constituent interests, where the concerns of the constituency carry the primary motivation in operational matters.

If I had to choose one governance model, I would advocate for the Constituent Representational model.

I believe this model type would provide the most comprehensive scope, allowing for the coverage of a wide range of issues important to the Hawaiian people.

  1. Are you willing to discuss other governance models?

Of course I am willing to discuss any other governance models.

In fact, another governance model which interests me is the Policy governance model.

This model focuses on governance, where policies establish the process of management, and “Task Teams” are utilized to assist in aspects of the work.

This allows the voices of the “Task Teams” to be heard, and an opportunity for the delegates to receive a perspective on an issue they had not observed.

It is my belief that three of the precepts of governance is the ability to listen, learn and work together.

  1. How would the governance model that you choose impact the ali‘i trusts, the Hawaiian Homestead Act, federal contracts made with Native Hawaiian businesses; grants provided by the United States for programs and services to the Native Hawaiian people?

The Constituent Representational model would work in tandem with the Ali’i Trust, the Hawaiian Homestead Act, federal contracts made with Native Hawaiian businesses and grants provided by the United States for programs and services to the Native Hawaiian people.

The main focus here is to provide for any issues or concerns of the Hawaiian people.

The Constituent Representational model focuses on constituent interests, where the concerns of the constituency carry the primary motivation.

As long as these existing entities are of interest to the constituency, the motivation will be collaborative and working together will be a nucleus as we move forward.

  1. In your governance model, would you be inclusive of people other than Native Hawaiians as citizens?

In this day and age, inclusiveness is key for the perpetuation of our world and our Hawaii. For the onset of this ’aha, we should focus on the Hawaiian people. But keep in mind that moving forward we would have to expand our purview to include the peoples of Hawaii.

Many of our Hawaiian people have mixed race relationships, and these significant others have been great supporters of our Hawaiian people. Also, there are citizens who were born and raised in our Hawaiian islands who are non-Hawaiian. It is these supporters and citizens I believe our governance should expand to include, and oversee all of these peoples of Hawaii.

  1. How do you see participation by others in helping the ‘aha on the various aspects of the draft constitution?

Creating such an important and significant charter of government as a constitution is a formidable task. Participation by others on many levels is the only way our delegates will be able to recognize as many facets of this inimitable document as possible.

Referencing the U.S. constitution; it took the delegates nearly 5 months before they reported a presentable draft.

I believe the participation of others would advance and enhance the creation of this far reaching manuscript of the people.

  1. Looking ahead, as a delegate to the ‘aha, how would you assure that the governance model ratified by the Native Hawaiian people is implemented and recognized at the state, federal, or international level, as appropriate.

Sponsoring, lobbying, advocating, and petitioning to raise the consciousness of the state, federal and international people are processes which can be utilized to further any charter or position ratified by the Hawaiian people.

However, our goal as delegates of the ’aha should be to make every effort to secure seats at the table where we have a Vote to enact change, not just a Voice to tell people of our work.

  1. Why should Native Hawaiians vote for you?

Endearing tenets provided by the constitution is the concept of Democracy and the ability to vote for a favored position.

Voting allows the people to have a voice to choose the delegate who shares the course of action which best represents their own concern. As I had stated in my campaign position, “the opportunity to correct or make proper the concerns of our Hawaiian people, and in doing so care for and protect our people going forward.”

I pray that my position is reflective of the concerns of the Hawaiian people.

If given the opportunity to represent, I will dedicate my full attention to the fruition of this ’aha. And to continue serving the Hawaiian people for as long as they find me in alignment to their own views and concerns.

I am here for the Hawaiian people. I appreciate your time and consideration, and humbly ask for the ability to represent you with your vote.